Schock

Synopsis: Prepare Yourself

When a family moves into a home with a shocking secret, their lives become a nightmare of homicidal hallucinations as their young son begins to communicate with the spirits of the dead. Remodeled in madness and painted in blood, they soon discover that domestic bliss can be murder…when home is where the horror is.

Released in America under the title Beyond The Door II, Shock is the final feature film directed by legendary horror maestro Mario Bava (Black Sunday, Twitch Of The Death Nerve). Daria Nicolodi (Deep Red, Phenomena) and John Steiner (Tenebre) star in this Euro Horror favorite.
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Schock 4.0

Man, oh man… here is a poor man’s ‘Poltergeist’ meets ‘The Shining’. This was hard to watch and it certainly wasn’t captivating enough to stop me from dozing off at the end; I managed to stay awake out of sheer will, but the movie wasn’t doing its part.

From the ham acting, the cheesy set-ups, to the teeth gnashingly annoying soundtrack, it was shlocky as heck (come to think of it, maybe they should change the title to reflect this). And I just didn’t find the development credible and I simply couldn’t stand that stupid little child actor – he was horrid. Honestly, low budget not-withstanding, there is no excuse for such a bad production.

One review called this “one of the best Italian horror films of the 1970s”, but I beg to differ. It’s not even one of the best Mario Bava films of the 1970s, for that matter – and that says a lot, because he’s really inconsistent. I mean, for every really good movie that Bava makes, he makes two that are a bit… ungood. Still, he’s a legend of the horror genre and is absolutely the godfather of Italian horror cinema.

I’ve been watching a lot of his films in the last two years (and even some of his son, Lamberto Bava’s, movies), because I was curious to know more about his oeuvre, and tis was pretty much the last one I had left. There are some good ones along the way, and I’m definitely more of a fan of his than of Dario Argento. But you have to pick and choose.

Either way, I don’t regret the trip – even if it ended on a bit of a sour note.

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One response to “Schock

  1. Pingback: Sei donne per l’assassino | thecriticaleye·

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