Tank Girl: Visions of Booga

Tank Girl - Visions of BoogaSummary: In Visions of Booga, we join Tank Girl and her marsupial hubby Booga as they find themselves the victims of the worst run of bad luck ever. Their tank has been lost in a wager and the Australian Mafia are after their pelts. Their only hope seems to lie on the other side of the country, with Booga’s estranged little brother. But even that can get mucked up, so strap on your Doc Martens, tighten your studded belt and spike your hair Tank Girl and company are on the loose!
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Tank Girl: Visions of Booga, by Alan C. Martin and Rufus Dayglo 6.75

Okay, for what it’s worth, this is the most cohesive Alan Martin-penned Tank Girl book that I’ve read thus far. Even he comments favourably about this particular oeuvre in the introduction, saying it’s one of his favourites.

I haven’t read the classic Tank Girl stuff, but I’d agree: so far, this one’s superior to the rest.

It’s still filled with inconsistencies, such as the characters being out of character from one page to the next, or even dying in one panel and returning in the next, but at least it has one full-length story, with a decent enough plot.

What Martin claims is that he was inspired by ‘Some Like it Hot‘ and wanted to do his take on it, but then eventually drifted off the mark as he went along. I can sort of see it in the initial pages, but I wouldn’t have clued in if not for his introductory notes.

What this ends up being is Tank Girl and company on the run from the Australian mob, tearing through the countryside, trying to save their hides. It’s not especially goal-oriented, but it has a number of interesting bits along the way, including the Book of Hipster Gold segment, which was delightful in its own way.

Rufus Dayglo provides the art again, and it’s competent and stylish – but I find his artwork for Gorillaz far more professional and appealing to the eyes. The colouring is done by Christian Crank, and he does an adequate job of filling the page. Unfortunately, he doesn’t add dimension to Dayglo’s art like Ashley Wood did.

Anyway, all this to say that ‘Visions of Booga’ is a decent enough read, but it still lacks finesse. I was fine with the lagging momentum, because Martin actually fleshed things out more than usual, but I believe that he should pay more attention to his scripts before having them committed to the page.

In my mind, he has yet to reach his full potential. And I truly look forward to the day that he does.

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